Events > 2018 > June > Nasty Women

About this event:

Created by Mary Diggin, Ph.D.

MAITREA Týnská ulička 6, 110 00 Prague, Czech Republic

Mythology is full of nasty women: the Greek Medusa, Babylonian Tiamat, the Irish Morrígan, the Mesopotamian Ereshkigal, the Hindu Kali. Powerful beings, the Nasty women of myth are associated with the mysteries of birth and death. They are warriors and queens, begetters and destroyers, lovers and mothers. In these stories, the goddess is flexible, sometimes devious, often shifting shape or purpose as she needs to get done what she needs to do. She values her freedom, her dexterity, her ability to weave in and out of situations, to be indirect, to be frightening, and to hold a dark energy that makes others uncomfortable.

In these myths, the hero is often portrayed as the nemesis of the goddess. Whether as warrior or light bringer or something else, the hero energy is routinely shown in opposition to the goddess. All too frequently, he is the one who defeats or dishonors her; rapes or kills her; and, sadly for women, is honored for doing so. Even today, Western culture values the hero and heroic energies more than it does those of the goddess, especially those goddesses who seem dark. In so many areas, the warrior hero, the defeater of the goddess, is given priority. In the boardroom, the government, the school yard and streets, the image of the warrior hero, the winner who defeats his enemy, is seen as the one to emulate. The Nasty women and Nasty goddesses are exiled. The result is the silencing of the goddess and a devaluing of her energies. `

Nasty Women workshop is a 2 day process of empowerment through engagement with the mythologies of dark goddesses. In the Nasty Women workshops we look in depth at 2 or 3 myths and discover what lessons are there for Women today. Nasty Women 1 will explore the Irish war goddess, the Morrígan and the Babylonian creator goddess, Tiamat. What can we learn from these goddesses both through their defeats and victories? How can they empower us? What do they teach us about power? What are the costs of not befriending the dark goddess? Through journeying into these myths through imagery, we discover the particular lessons we need to take away with us from the stories we have explored.